Now what?

You saw the exhibition and that took all of five-ten minutes. You want to do something more with your time in the big city? How about a haircut by Yasu at the Nakamura Biyoshitsu (Salon)? More information can be found at his website: http://yasunakamura.com/.  If you can read Japanese, he also has another website and blog that list his prices: http://www.nakamura-biyoushitu.com/.

Yasu Nakamura
Yasu Nakamura

He worked in New York for many years, speaks English, and imports dyes and some hair products from the United States. The occasional celebrity or circus performer might also pop in while you are there to get a trim. I kid you not.

After you have made an appointment and have seen the amazing art made by yours truly, walk for about one minute to the corner of the road. (That means you turn left when you leave the gallery’s building.) Are you feeling a little unsure about where you are going? Don’t worry! Can you see the modern white church called Daimyo Cross Garden at the end of the street? If so, you are going in the right direction.

Daimyo Cross Garden
Daimyo Cross Garden

The street turns left, so you should too. Turn onto the first street on your right. You should be able to see a small, retro beauty shop with a brick storefront almost immediately on your left. That is the Nakamura Biyoshitsu (Salon). The shop was originally run his mother-in-law, and he renovated the place with all kinds of beautiful antiques.

Blurry exterior of Nakamura Biyoshitsu
Blurry exterior of Nakamura Biyoshitsu

What else can you do? How about a pint in a British pub very close to the hair salon and on the same side of the street but in a larger, more modern building. (I have not been there, so I don’t know the hours or if it is any good or not. I think it has been there for a while, so that is a good sign.)

Three Kings British pub
Three Kings British pub

Are you hungry? Well, if you want to try some falafel or hummus at a Sudanese restaurant called Kebabooz, you are going to have to walk to the other side of the block. Keep heading down the same street away from the gallery and the salon. Turn right at the first corner, and then turn right again so you are heading back to Z-side. By the way, Kebabooz does not sell alcohol, but you are allowed to bring some with you. That Lawson’s along the way is your last chance to pick up a beer to go with your shishkabob. They do sell other drinks as well as coffee and chai, just not alcohol.

Convenience store: Lawson
Convenience store: Lawson

The restaurant is on the left side of the street but it is a little hard to find. Keep an eye out for a signboard on the street in front of what looks like a building filled with bars,

Kebabooz for Sudanese food in Japan
Kebabooz for Sudanese food in Japan

Kebabooz is on the first floor, so you don’t have to go upstairs. Just like with the gallery,  you have to go further inside to find the door. Sana and the staff will greet you with big smiles! (When you look at the menu, tamiya are falafel balls. The smaller, cheaper choice is half of a pita. I recommend the ful (pronounced “fool”) if they have some.)

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