Outsider Art or Outside Reproductions?

I often cycle by a house that has hand-drawn portraits hanging outside on their concrete fence. At first, from a distance, I thought somebody had copied photographs of people onto cardboard and hung them outside. One day, however, I stopped and looked carefully at the portraits. They were ceramics!

IMG_7814

IMG_7817

IMG_7815

I think this is a copy of a famous painting from the 1920s-1930s. I know the style but not the artist’s name. Sorry!

IMG_7820

This person also made vases. These two show the wind god and the thunder god from a screen by Tawaraya Sotatsu in Kyoto. It is a national treasure from Kennin-ji Temple.

IMG_7819

Is that Kiki, the little witch that ran a delivery service? Not sure…

IMG_7824

 

Two plant holders looked like soccer balls with the top cut out. (Saitama is known for its soccer fans who go to extremes to show their support.)

IMG_7816

IMG_7825Even the top of the mailbox has a ceramic plaque on its top! More soccer!

IMG_7823

This little piano box sits on top of the brick fence with a lid that can be opened. Nothing was inside except for dead leaves.

IMG_7821

This clock was quite small but it showed the correct time! Kimono-clad time keeper?

IMG_7828The two on the right are copies of famous bijin (beauties) from ukiyo-e woodblock prints.  I wonder why they are hanging in frames rather than cemented directly onto the wall dividing the properties. More copies of famous Japanese pictures can be seen on the far wall, too.

Who is this person? I think whoever it is went beyond what people do at classes in the community centre. This person obviously enjoys Japanese art and has the talent to copy famous pieces of art. Only the three-dimensional pieces, however, are originals instead of reproductions. If these are reproductions, do they qualify as outsider art? Or are they just outside art? After stopping my bike to get a closer look, I have more questions than answers. What do you think?

 

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s